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Acne

Did you know?
  • Vitamin D was voted best acne treatment Feb 2011 http://www.acne.org
  • Topical Vitamin D appears help acne (oil, cream, or paste made from capsules)
  • Putting vitamin D on an affected area for a few days often clears up acne
  • An acne clinical trial with Vitamin D intervention is underway   (More acne info below)

Learn how Vitamin D is essential for good health
  Watch a 5 minute video "Does Less Sun Mean more Disease?"
  Browse for other Health Problems and D in left column or here
  see also Supplementing for D and More in the menu at the top of very page

Vitamin D is very good for the skin, acne

Web also shows popularity of vitamin D for the skin, acne

Study found no improvement in chronic eczema with 2,000 IU of vitamin D for 3 months

Serum Vitamin D levels and Vitamin D supplementation do not correlate with the severity of chronic eczema in children March 2015
Results"Vitamin D concentrations in patients with moderate and severe eczema were not statistically different from Vitamin D concentration detected in the serum of patients with mild eczema. Furthermore, we did not find any correlation between Vitamin D levels, total IgEs and SCORAD index, both in the Sensitized and in the Not-Sensitized group. The Vitamin D3 supplementation did not influence the SCORAD severity or the total IgEs concentration."

VitaminDWiki wonders why. Perhaps because they did not use topical vitamin D?

Vitamin D levels do not matter with Eczema until about age 4 - Dec 2015

Associations of maternal and fetal 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels with childhood eczema. The Generation R Study.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol. 2015 Dec 19. doi: 10.1111/pai.12530. [Epub ahead of print]
Gazibara T1,2,3,4, Elbert NJ1,5, den Dekker HT1,2,3, de Jongste JC2, Reiss I6, McGrath JJ7,8, Eyles DW7,8, Burne TH7,8, Tiemeier H3,9,10, Jaddoe VW1,3,11, Pasmans SG5, Duijts L2,3,6.

BACKGROUND:
Exposure to low levels of vitamin D in fetal life might affect the developing immune system, and subsequently the risk of childhood eczema. We examined whether 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels in mid-gestation and at birth were associated with the risk of eczema until the age of 4 years.
METHODS:
In a population-based prospective cohort study of 3,019 mothers and their children, maternal blood samples in mid-gestation and umbilical cord blood samples at birth were used to determine 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels (severely deficient <25.0 nmol/L, deficient 25.0-49.9 nmol/L, sufficient 50.0-74.9 nmol/L, optimal ≥75.0 nmol/L). Eczema was prospectively assessed by annual questionnaires until the age of 4 years. Eczema patterns included never, early (age ≤1 year only), late (age >1 year only), and persistent eczema (age ≤ and >1 year). Data were assessed using generalized estimating equations and multinomial regression models.
RESULTS:
Compared with the optimal 25-hydroxyvitamin D group, sufficient, deficient and severely deficient groups of 25-hydroxyvitamin D level in mid-gestation were not associated with the risk of overall eczema (odds ratios (95%confidence interval): 1.09 (0.82, 1.43), 1.04 (0.87, 1.25) and 0.94 (0.81, 1.10), p-values for trend >0.05), nor with eczema per year or eczema patterns in children up to the age of 4 years. Similarly, we observed no associations of 25-hydroxyvitamin D groups at birth with any eczema outcome.
CONCLUSION:
Our results suggest that levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D in mid-gestation and at birth are not associated with the risk of overall eczema, eczema per year or eczema patterns among children until the age of 4 years

PMID: 26683760

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