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Weaker hand grip if poor Vitamin D Receptor (15 percent) – Nov 2016

Muscle strength is associated with vitamin D receptor gene variants.

J Orthop Res. 2016 Nov;34(11):2031-2037. doi: 10.1002/jor.23220. Epub 2016 Mar 14.
Bozsodi A1,2, Boja S1, Szilagyi A1, Somhegyi A1, Varga PP1, Lazary A1.

VitaminDWiki

Vitamin D Receptor category has the following

189 items in Vitamin D Receptor category

Vitamin D tests cannot detect Vitamin D Receptor (VDR) problems
A poor VDR restricts Vitamin D from getting in the cells

A poor VDR increases the risk of 37 health problems  click here for details

VDR at-home test $29 - results not easily understood in 2016
There are hints that you may have inherited a poor VDR
You can compensate for poor VDR by increasing one or more of the following:

IncreasingIncreases
1) Vitamin D supplement
  Sun, Ultraviolet -B
Vitamin D in the blood
and thus to the cells
2) MagnesiumVitamin D in the blood
 AND to the cells
3) Omega-3 Vitamin D to the cells
4) Resveratrol Vitamin D to the cells
5) Intense exercise Vitamin D Receptor
6) Get prescription for VDR activator
   paricalcitol, maxacalcitol?
Vitamin D Receptor
7) Quercetin (flavonoid) Vitamin D Receptor

Overview Sports and vitamin D has the following

Athletes are helped by vitamin D by:

  1. Faster reaction time
  2. Far fewer colds/flus during the winter
  3. Less sore/tired after a workout
  4. Fewer micro-cracks and broken bones
  5. Bones which do break heal much more quickly
  6. Increased VO2 and exercise endurance Feb 2011
  7. Indoor athletes especially need vitamin D
  8. Professional indoor athletes are starting to supplement with vitamin D or use vitamin D beds
  9. Olympic athletes have used UV/vitamin D since the 1930's
  10. The biggest gain from the use of vitamin D is by those who exercise less than 2 hours per day.
  11. Reduced muscle fatigue with 10,000 IU vitamin D daily
  12. Muscle strength improved when vitamin D added: 3 Meta-analysis



 Download the PDF from VitaminDWiki

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Vitamin D receptor (VDR) is an important candidate gene in muscle function. Scientific reports on the effect of its genetic variants on muscle strength are contradictory likely due to the inconsistent study designs. Hand grip strength (HGS) is a highly heritable phenotype of muscle strength but only limited studies are available on its genetic background. Association between VDR polymorphisms and HGS has been poorly investigated and previous reports are conflicting. We studied the effect of VDR gene variants on HGS in a sample of 706 schoolchildren. Genomic DNA was extracted from saliva samples and six candidate single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) across the VDR gene were genotyped with Sequenom MassARRAY technique. HGS was measured with a digital dynamometer in both hands. Single marker and haplotype associations were adjusted for demographic parameters. Three SNPs, rs4516035 (A1012G; p = 0.009), rs1544410 (BsmI; p = 0.010), and rs731236 (TaqI; p = 0.038) and a 3' UTR haploblock constructed by three SNPs (Bsml-Taq1-rs10783215; p < 0.005) showed significantly associations with HGS of the dominant hand. In the non-dominant hand, the effects of the A1012G (p = 0.034) and the 3' UTR haploblock (p < 0.01) on HGS were also significant. Since the promoter SNP (A10112G) and the 3' UTR haplotype were proved to be associated with the expression and the stability of the VDR mRNA in earlier studies, VDR variants can be supposed to have a direct effect on muscle strength. The individual genetic patterns can also explain the inconsistency of the previously published clinical results on the association between vitamin D and muscle function.

Created by admin. Last Modification: Sunday November 12, 2017 17:07:07 UTC by admin. (Version 3)

Attached files

ID Name Comment Uploaded Size Downloads
8722 Handgrip strength VDR.jpg admin 12 Nov, 2017 16:04 20.32 Kb 25
8721 Muscle Strength VDR.pdf admin 12 Nov, 2017 16:04 387.15 Kb 6
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