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Type 1 Diabetes association with poor Vitamin D Receptor: 39 studies – April 2017

Inherited Variation in Vitamin D Genes and Type 1 Diabetes Predisposition

Genes 2017, 8(4), 125; doi:10.3390/genes8040125 (registering DOI)

VitaminDWiki
  • Vitamin D tests do not detect poor Vitamin D Receptor and 4 other classes of vitamin D genes.
  • Thus, you can have a good blood level of vitamin D but get T1 Diabetes and many other health problems because genes limit the amount of vitamin D getting to the cells
  • Health problems that run in families are often associated with low vitamin D - and genes decreasing Vitamin D getting to cells

Pages listed in BOTH of the categories Diabetes and Vitamin D Receptor

Vitamin D Receptor category has the following

190 items in Vitamin D Receptor category

Vitamin D tests cannot detect Vitamin D Receptor (VDR) problems
A poor VDR restricts Vitamin D from getting in the cells

A poor VDR increases the risk of 37 health problems  click here for details

VDR at-home test $29 - results not easily understood in 2016
There are hints that you may have inherited a poor VDR
You can compensate for poor VDR by increasing one or more of the following:

IncreasingIncreases
1) Vitamin D supplement
  Sun, Ultraviolet -B
Vitamin D in the blood
and thus to the cells
2) MagnesiumVitamin D in the blood
 AND to the cells
3) Omega-3 Vitamin D to the cells
4) Resveratrol Vitamin D to the cells
5) Intense exercise Vitamin D Receptor
6) Get prescription for VDR activator
   paricalcitol, maxacalcitol?
Vitamin D Receptor
7) Quercetin (flavonoid) Vitamin D Receptor


See chart at the bottom of VDR page for Magnesium, Omega-3 and Resveratrol

If poor Vitamin D Receptor

Risk
increase
Health Problem
13Sepsis
9.6Chronic Periodontitis
   and smoke
7.6Crohn's disease
5.8Low back pain in athletes
5Ulcerative Colitis
5Coronary Artery Disease
4.6Breast Cancer
4polycystic ovary syndrome
3.3 Pre-term birth
3.1 Lumbar Disc Degeneration
3.1 Colon Cancer survival
3 Multiple Sclerosis
3Dengue
3 Waist size
3 Ischemic Stroke
3Alzheimer’s
2.8Osteoporosis & COPD
2.7Gastric Cancer
2.6Lupus in children
2.4Lung Cancer
2.3Autism
2Diabetic Retinopathy
2Parkinson's
2 Wheezing/Asthma
2 Melanoma   Non-melanoma Skin Cancers
2Myopia
1.9Uterine Fibroids
1.9Early tooth decay
1.8Diabetic nephropathy
1.6Diabetes - Type I
1.6Prostate Cancer while black
1.5 Diabetes -Type II
1.5Pertusus
1.4 Rheumatoid arthritis
1.3Childhood asthma
1.3Tuberculosis


 Download the PDF from VitaminDWiki


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Marissa Penna-Martinez and Klaus Badenhoop
Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism, Department of Medicine 1, University Hospital Frankfurt, Theodor-Stern-Kai 7, D-60590 Frankfurt am Main, Germany
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Genetics and Functional Genomics of Diabetes Mellitus)

The etiology and pathophysiology of type 1 diabetes remain largely elusive with no established concepts for a causal therapy. Efforts to clarify genetic susceptibility and screening for environmental factors have identified the vitamin D system as a contributory pathway that is potentially correctable. This review aims at compiling all genetic studies addressing the vitamin D system in type 1 diabetes. Herein, association studies with case control cohorts are presented as well as family investigations with transmission tests, meta-analyses and intervention trials. Additionally, rare examples of inborn errors of vitamin D metabolism manifesting with type 1 diabetes and their immune status are discussed.
We find a majority of association studies confirming a predisposing role for vitamin D receptor (VDR) polymorphisms and those of the vitamin D metabolism, particularly the CYP27B1 gene encoding the main enzyme for vitamin D activation. Associations, however, are tenuous in relation to the ethnic background of the studied populations. Intervention trials identify the specific requirements of adequate vitamin D doses to achieve vitamin D sufficiency. Preliminary evidence suggests that doses may need to be individualized in order to achieve target effects due to pharmacogenomic variation.

Attached files

ID Name Comment Uploaded Size Downloads
7928 T1D VDR T2B.jpg admin 20 Apr, 2017 15:30 142.63 Kb 49
7927 T1D VDR T2A.jpg admin 20 Apr, 2017 15:30 77.61 Kb 47
7926 Genes and T1 Diabetes.pdf PDF 2017 admin 20 Apr, 2017 15:03 504.96 Kb 54
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