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Children stayed in ICU 3.5 days longer if low vitamin D – Dec 2015

Vitamin D deficiency and length of pediatric intensive care unit stay: a prospective observational study.

Ann Intensive Care. 2016 Dec;6(1):3. doi: 10.1186/s13613-015-0102-8. Epub 2016 Jan 8.
Sankar J1, Lotha W2, Ismail J3, Anubhuti C4,5, Meena RS6, Sankar MJ7.
1Department of Pediatrics, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India. jhumaji at gmail.com.
2Department of Pediatrics, PGIMER, Dr RML Hospital, New Delhi, India. wonash_tsanglao at yahoo.co.in.
3Department of Pediatrics, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India. javedisi86 at gmail.com.
4Department of Pediatrics, PGIMER, Dr RML Hospital, New Delhi, India. anubhuti1234 at rediffmail.com.
5Department of Biochemistry, PGIMER, Dr RML Hospital, New Delhi, India. anubhuti1234 at rediffmail.com.
6Department of Pediatrics, PGIMER, Dr RML Hospital, New Delhi, India. drrameshwaruk at gmail.com.
7Department of Pediatrics, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India. jeevasankar at gmail.com.

BACKGROUND:
Due to the limited data available in the pediatric population and lack of interventional studies to show that administration of vitamin D indeed improves clinical outcomes, opinion is still divided as to whether it is just an innocent bystander or a marker of severe disease. Our objective was therefore to estimate the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency in children admitted to intensive care unit (ICU) and to examine its association with duration of ICU stay and other key clinical outcomes.
METHODS:
We prospectively enrolled children aged 1 month-17 years admitted to the ICU over a period of 8 months (n = 101). The primary objectives were to estimate the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency (serum 25 (OH) <20 ng/mL) at 'admission' and to examine its association with length of ICU stay.
RESULTS:
The prevalence of vitamin D deficiency was 74 % (95 % CI: 65-88). The median (IQR) duration of ICU stay was significantly longer in 'vitamin D deficient' children (7 days; 2-12) than in those with 'no vitamin D deficiency' (3 days; 2-5; p = 0.006). On multivariable analysis, the association between length of ICU stay and vitamin D deficiency remained significant, even after adjusting for key baseline variables, diagnosis, illness severity (PIM-2), PELOD, and need for fluid boluses, ventilation, inotropes and mortality [adjusted mean difference (95 % CI): 3.5 days (0.50-6.53); p = 0.024].
CONCLUSIONS:
We observed a high prevalence of vitamin D deficiency in critically ill children in our study population. Vitamin D deficient children had a longer duration of ICU stay as compared to others.

PMID: 26745966


See also VitaminDWiki

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