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Cola Soft Drinks reduce Calcium and vitamin D

A surf of the web seems to indicate that:

  1. There is phosphoric acid in cola drinks (both regular and diet)
  2. Having more than perhaps 1 liter per day of colas provides more acid than the body can deal with.
  3. Increases acidity reduces the Calcium in the body – in bone and teeth
  4. Vitamin D is consumed in the body in the process of trying to restore the lost Calcium


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Pop-cola acids and tooth erosion: an in vitro, in vivo, electron-microscopic, and clinical report.

Int J Dent. 2010;2010:957842. Epub 2010 Dec 2.
Borjian A, Ferrari CC, Anouf A, Touyz LZ.
McGill Faculty of Dentistry, Montreal, PQ, H3A 2B2, Canada.

Introduction. Manufactured Colas are consumed universally as soft drinks. Evidence about the acid contents of Cola-beverages and its effects on teeth is rare. Aim. To assess (i) cola acidity and buffering capacity in vitro, (ii) tooth erosion after swishing with colas in vivo (iii) scanning electron microscopic effects on teeth of colas, and tooth-brush abrasion, and (iv) report a clinical case of erosion from cola consumption.

Materials and Methods. (i) We measured six commercially available pop "Cola beverages", pH, and buffering capacities using a pH-Mettler Automatic Titrator, with weak solution of Sodium Hydroxide (ii) two cohorts, one with teeth, the second without teeth rinsed with aliquots of Cola for 60 seconds. Swished cola samples tested for calcium and phosphorus contents using standardized chemical analytical methods (iii) enamel, dentine, and the enamel-cemental junction from unerupted extracted wisdom teeth were examined with a scanning electron microscope after exposure to colas, and tested for tooth-brush abrasion; (iv) a clinical case of pop cola erosion presentation, are all described.

Results. Comparisons among pop colas tested in vitro reveal high acidity with very low pH. Buffering capacities in millilitres of 0.5?M NaOH needed to increase one pH unit, to pH 5.5 and pH 7 are reported. Rinsing in vivo with pop cola causes leeching of calcium from teeth; SEM shows dental erosion, and pop-cola consumption induces advanced dental erosion and facilitates abrasion.

Conclusions. (i) Pop-Cola acid activity is below the critical pH 5.5 for tooth dissolution, with high buffering capacities countering neutralization effects of saliva; (ii) calcium is leeched out of teeth after rinsing with pop colas; (iii) SEM evidence explains why chronic exposure to acid pop colas causes dental frangibles; (iv) a clinical case of pop-cola erosion confirms this. PMID: 21151663 CLICK HERE for full text
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Soft drinks cause soft bones, but is it also time to slay the sacred cow?

http://www.drbriffa.com/2006/10/09/soft-drinks-cause-soft-bones-and-is-it-time-to-slay-the-sacred-cow/
October 2006
Clipped – – – This month’s edition of the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition has published a study which found that women drinking four or more cola drinks a week were at increased risk of reduced bone density (1). And this is not the first evidence that has linked the drinking of fizzy drinks to weaker bones. A number of explanations are generally put forward to attempt to explain this phenomenon. A constituent of cola is phosphoric acid, which is believed to impart a degree of acidity within the body that increases the risk that calcium is leeched from the bone. Caffeine, another common component in cola drinks, is also believed to stimulate calcium loss.
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WebMD: Soda and Osteoporosis: Is There a Connection? – Feb 2007

http://www.webmd.com/osteoporosis/features/soda-osteoporosis
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“New research indicates that there may be more to the soda and osteoporosis connection than simply replacing the good stuff with the useless stuff.
Researchers at Tufts University, studying several thousand men and women, found that women who regularly drank cola-based sodas — three or more a day — had almost 4% lower bone mineral density in the hip, even though researchers controlled for calcium and vitamin D intake. But women who drank non-cola soft drinks, like Sprite or Mountain Dew, didn't appear to have lower bone density.”
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Clip from Wikipedia entry on Osteoporosis

Soft drinks—some studies indicate that soft drinks (many of which contain phosphoric acid) may increase risk of osteoporosis; 21 Others suggest soft drinks may displace calcium-containing drinks from the diet rather than directly causing osteoporosis. 22

  • 21 Tucker KL, Morita K, Qiao N, Hannan MT, Cupples LA, Kiel DP (2006). "Colas, but not other carbonated beverages, are associated with low bone mineral density in older women: The Framingham Osteoporosis Study". Am. J. Clin. Nutr. 84 (4): 936–42. PMID 17023723.
  • 22 American Academy of Pediatrics Committee on School Health (2004). "Soft drinks in schools". Pediatrics 113 (1 Pt 1): 152–4. doi:10.1542/peds.113.1.152. PMID 14702469.

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Babies have different problem, not cola.

When switching from vitamin D fortified milk to fruit juices there is a significant decrease in vitamin D – which appears to cause all kinds of health problems.
Some fruit juices in the US have been fortified with vitamin D since about 2002 appears to be 100 IU of vitamin D per cup. Have no idea if 100 IU is enough, but it should help.
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Cola at Advancing your health March 2012

  • According to findings from a study at Harvard, 9th and 10th grade girls who consume sodas are at 3X the risk for bone fractures compared to those who don’t.
  • Research out of Tufts University shows that “women–but not men–who drank more than three 12-ounce servings of cola per day
    had 2.3 percent to 5.1 percent lower bone-mineral density in the hip than women who consumed less than one serving of cola per day.”
  • In a 2010 study from the Journal of American Dietetic Association, 170 girls were followed from age 5 to 15.
    Of those, the participants who drank soda at age 5 were less likely to drink milk throughout childhood than those who didn’t consume soda at age 5.
    Those who drank soda from the age of 5 were also more likely to consume diets lacking in calcium, fiber, vitamin D, protein, magnesium, phosphorus and potassium.

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See also VitaminDWiki

See also web

  1. 43% increase in heart attack and stroke if one per day
  2. decrease bone mineral density
  3. 34% more metabolic syndrome: in group which drank the most diet soda
  4. 67% increase in type 2 diabetes if one per day
  5. 55% increase in obesity


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Health Problems and D

  # of studies as of 11/24/14